Gratitude

The science behind

Generosity

We have partnered with UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center to provide you with these scientific facts. Click on an item below to expand and reveal more.

Studies find that generosity triggers the release of endorphins in our body, a phenomenon commonly referred to as a “helper’s high.”

People who feel happy are more likely to be kind to others, creating an upward spiral of happiness and kindness.

One study found that people who provided social support to others had lower blood pressure than those who didn’t.

People who come into contact with generous people often follow suit. In fact, research has shown that kindness can spread by three degrees—from person to person to person to person.

Research suggests it’s possible to increase your capacity for generosity over time—for instance, by broadening your social networks, actively trying to take someone else’s perspective, or even by meditating.

HERE ARE 3 EXERCISES, PROVIDED BY UC BERKELEY'S GREATER GOOD SCIENCE CENTER, TO HELP YOU WITH GENEROSITY RIGHT NOW

remembering connection exercise